What country in the Middle East has a theocracy?

What country in the Middle East has a theocracy?

Iran. Iran has been described as a “theocratic republic” by the CIA World Factbook, and its constitution has been described as a “hybrid” of “theocratic and democratic elements” by Francis Fukuyama. Like other Islamic states, it maintains religious laws and has religious courts to interpret all aspects of law.

Is Saudi Shiite or Sunni?

Most of the 15 to 20 million Saudi citizens are Sunni Muslims, while the eastern regions are populated mostly by Twelver Shia, and there are Zaydi Shia in the southern regions.

Who rules in a theocracy?

A theocracy is a type of government where one or more priests rule in the name of a deity. A god or goddess is recognized as the supreme ruler, and the laws based on religious law.

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Are there theocracies today?

A theocracy is a type of government where one or more priests rule in the name of a deity. Tibet, Israel, and China were all once theocracies. Today, there aren’t many theocracies globally, but there are a few nations with this type of government.

How many countries have theocracy?

7 Countries With A Theocratic Government Today – WorldAtlas.

Should we be worried about the Middle East Revolution?

When the so-called revolutions of the region began to produce instability and violence, some analysts suggested there was no need to worry. What was happening in the Middle East was a process, albeit a painful one, that was common to countries that had undergone transitions to democracy.

Is Iran a theocracy or aocracy?

“Theocracy” means rule by God. Since God doesn’t involve himself in human politics, there are no true theocracies, only pseudo-theocracies. The claim to be a “theocracy” is therefore a hollow one. Iran, with a majority of Muslims, does claim to be a “theocratic republic”, so they are in fact a pseudo-theocracy.

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What does the future of the Middle East look like?

B loodshed, fragmentation, and repression portend a Middle Eastern future very different from the democratic dreams that many Western observers and some young locals entertained in 2011 and 2012. When the so-called revolutions of the region began to produce instability and violence, some analysts suggested there was no need to worry.

Can regime change lead to democracy?

Regimes can change within state structures (as in Tunisia) without constituting a revolution; dynasties can change within regimes, too, (as in Egypt) in ways that fall far short of a revolution. Moreover, revolutions, which are radicalizing by definition, do not always lead to democracy.